Homemade Peach Jam

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Perfectly sweetened and wonderfully spiced jam with just a hint of cinnamon, Homemade Peach Jam has been a staple in our home for about 15 years.

Every year, I wait until we can order peaches by the case. Then I roll up my sleeves and set to work making and canning a year’s worth of delicious jam.

Homemade Peach Jam

Several years ago, about the time I started this website, the peaches were very late getting to our area. They finally arrived the day before I was headed out of town. I was looking forward to making jam just as soon as they were at the perfect stage of ripeness.

I glanced around at all my wonderful peaches and panicked because I knew they were going to be way past perfect by the time I returned home. I was on my way to being disappointed; when Sean very casually told me that he’d take care of it.

Now, I admit that jam making is not difficult. It is actually quite easy. However, it can also be time-consuming (especially, when you are not familiar with it all) and it is not a simple thing to accomplish with three small children running through the house all weekend.

I assured him that he shouldn’t worry about it, but if he really wanted to do it, I would set out the recipe and the jars for him.

Well, I came home a couple of days later to 24 jars of peach jam. Perfectly sweetened and wonderfully spiced jam with just a hint of cinnamon.

I am beside myself with joy and more in love with my wonderful husband than ever before. Did he really want to spend his time making jam this past weekend? That’s doubtful.

However, he did it for me, as a gift of love. That makes every bite of this delicious jam taste even more delicious. 

When I first posted this recipe on the site in 2011, it was just the photo of jam jars that Sean filled for me. I’ve since updated the post with a video, and plenty of step by step photos. I hope it’s helpful to you in your jam making endeavors!

Get the tips for EASY peach peeling at barefeetinthekitchen.comPeach Jam

Store-bought jams and preserves just can’t compare with the taste of the homemade stuff and this peach jam is no exception. Nothing says “summer” like biting into a fresh, sweet, juicy peach at the perfect stage of ripeness. This jam manages to capture all that spectacular warm weather flavor in a jar for eating any time of the year.

Peach Jam jam is phenomenal on all kinds of breads, muffins, and scones.

Toast a slice of Tender High Rising Gluten Free Sandwich Bread   or English Muffin Bread and spread with a thick layer of peach jam for a sweet way to start the day. Blueberry Bran Muffins and Peach Jam are another great breakfast pairing to enjoy with your morning cup of coffee or tea.

Did you know you can also put peach jam in homemade ice cream? I found this out after a happy accident with a jar of peach jam lead to a surprising frozen treat in the form of Strawberry Peach Jam Ice Cream. 

Simmering fresh peaches for jam making - get the recipe at barefeetinthekitchen.com

Peach Jam Recipe

There are so many peach jam recipes out there but this one is my go-to for a daily spread. Like many recipes, it starts with plenty of fresh peaches, sugar, and pectin. Lemon juice adds both a tart flavor and acidity that helps with the “preserving” part of homemade preserves.

I add just a touch of with cinnamon or allspice to the recipe for the perfect amount of spice. It’s enough to give this jam a hint of something special without totally overwhelming that incredible peach flavor.

When you serve this jam, don’t be surprised if you’re peppered with questions about what that secret ingredient is that makes it so darn good.

Skim the froth off the boiling jam, but don't throw it away, it's delicious!

Canning Peach Jam

This is a fairly standard and easy recipe for canning jam but, as I mentioned before, it is time-consuming. Set aside a good chunk of time for getting the jam prepared and processed and make sure all your equipment is clean and ready to go before you get started.

For this recipe, I use the hot water bath method of processing jars. You don’t need any fancy canning equipment!

Funneling jam into jars for canning - get the recipe at barefeetinthekitchen.com

Don’t be intimidated if you’ve never canned your own preserves before. It’s easy to learn and a fantastic skill to have in your toolbox. My friend Rebecca has a good Canning Basics guide here with more tips!

Once you get started making your own homemade jam, there’s a whole world of recipes out there for you to explore.

Don't forget to wipe any spills on the jar rims before processing and sealing - get the recipe at barefeetinthekitchen.com

Habanero Peach Jam is a spicy hot pepper jam spin on this recipe that’s delicious on toast, crackers, and any which way you eat it. Cranberry Pepper Jam is another sweet and spicy variety that’s perfect to give as a gift and enjoy yourself.

Not all jams have to be sweet! Tomato Jam is a savory preserve (with just a touch of sweetness from fresh ripe tomatoes) that I especially love to eat spread on fluffy biscuits and cornbread. 

But if you only make one jam recipe in your life, this Peach Jam is an excellent choice. Full of fruity, peachy goodness and simple and straightforward to make, this is one recipe you’ll want to make every peach season for years to come. 

Homemade Peach Jam on toast is a treat! get the recipe at barefeetinthekitchen.com

Peach Jam Recipe

  1. Sort and wash fully ripe peaches. Remove stems, skins, bruises, and pits. Chop peaches and add to a large pot.
  2. Crush or smash the peaches. Add lemon juice and pectin; stir well. Place on high heat and, while stirring constantly, bring to a full rolling boil with bubbles over the entire surface.
  3. Add the sugar and spices all at once and heat again to a full bubbling boil. Boil hard for 1 minute (set a timer), stirring constantly.
  4. Remove from heat; skim the foam off the top. (We keep the foam in the refrigerator and enjoy it on toast for the next couple of days. I love it warm straight off the stove as well!)
  5. Pour immediately into sterile canning jars. Fill the jars to 1/4 inch from the top. Seal them and process 5 minutes in a boiling water bath.

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Homemade Peach Jam

4.89 from 51 votes
Perfectly sweetened and wonderfully spiced jam with just a hint of cinnamon is fantastic for every occasion.
Pin Print Review
Prep Time: 20 mins
Cook Time: 6 mins
Total Time: 26 mins
Course: Condiment
Cuisine: American
Servings: 6 half-pint jars

Ingredients 

  • 3 pounds fresh peaches - 4 cups crushed this was about 7 medium size peaches
  • 1 package powdered pectin (approximately 1.75 ounces)
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 5 cups sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon or allspice

Instructions

  • Sort and wash fully ripe peaches. Remove stems, skins, bruises and pits. Crush peaches.
  • Measure crushed peaches into a large pot. Add lemon juice and pectin; stir well. Place on high heat and, while stirring constantly, bring to a full rolling boil with bubbles over the entire surface. Add the sugar and spices all at once and heat again to a full bubbling boil. Boil hard for 1 minute (set a timer), stirring constantly.
  • Remove from heat; skim foam off the top. (We keep the foam in the refrigerator and enjoy it on toast for the next couple of days. I love it warm straight off the stove as well!)
  • Pour immediately into sterile canning jars. Fill the jars to 1/4 inch from the top. Seal them and process 5 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Nutrition

Calories: 735kcal · Carbohydrates: 188g · Protein: 2g · Sodium: 2mg · Potassium: 430mg · Fiber: 3g · Sugar: 185g · Vitamin A: 740IU · Vitamin C: 16.9mg · Calcium: 14mg · Iron: 0.6mg
Tried this recipe?Mention @WPRecipeMaker or tag #wprecipemaker!

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{originally published 9/26/11 – recipe notes and photos updated 7/20/20}

Homemade Peach Jam

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Mary Younkin

Mary Younkin

Hi, I’m Mary. I’m the author, cook, photographer, and travel lover behind the scenes here at Barefeet In The Kitchen. I'm also the author of three cookbooks dedicated to making cooking from scratch as simple as possible.

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  1. Debbi says

    Well …..
    It sounds like not only is your hubby lucky to have YOU.
    But you are lucky to have him too !!!
    I don't know many husbands who would have done that.
    I'm so glad you now have your peach jam for this winter.
    Yummm

  2. Kitchen Belleicious says

    Wow, I love all types of jam but I have to admit that peach jam is my favorite and one look at the color of that jam and those peaches and i am already hooked on yours or your man's per say! I love it! great job

  3. prairiepixie says

    Peaches are the best! I highly recommend awaytogarden.com as a site for seasonal preservation recipes (I am not affiliated with the site; I just admire it.)

    Got a kick out of the fact that you got your peaches from Utah. Read "Diary of a Woman Homesteader" sometime — it seems people have been heading to Utah for years for their peaches.

  4. Becki Jacobs says

    Wow, I am very impressed! I am trying to think of what my husband would have done. I am thinking i would probably have a freezer full of sliced peaches, but no Jam. This looks wonderful and love the spices.

  5. Grace In Full Measure says

    Awwww, how sweet of your husband 🙂 Those peach jams look delicious! And wow, how fresh! Peaches don't grow in the Philippines but I did make some mango jam over the summer. Mango with a bit of grated ginger worked really well.

  6. Demandra says

    Hey, can I borrow your husband? I got some stuff I need to take care of around the house and mine just plays computer games all day long. I pay in back talk and grief!

  7. Crossed Hooks Paddlers says

    The Georgia Elberta peaches were harvested the past two weeks, got me a case last week and made 2 batches of jam… They came out really really GOOD!!!
    I'll adjust my recipe with less sugar, because it called for 6 cups, and I thought it was a tad sweet

    THankss

  8. Anonymous says

    just tried your recipe today. Soooooo good. Thank you for posting it. And that was a wonderful thing your hubby did for you. Again thank you

    • Mary Younkin says

      While the inversion canning method is much debated for safety reasons, you can simply store the jam in the refrigerator until ready to use. Alternatively, if you use shorter jars, you can process the water bath in a soup pot as pictured in the video.

      • Audrey von Gease says

        Thanks for the tip. My peaches needed to be dealt with immediately. They were about to morph into something out of a science fiction novel. My double batch is not only extremely delicious, I must have lucked out, as the jam has also set well. I might add that I to wouldn’t recommend the double batch not only for the setting problems but also for safety reasons. It seems that when you have that much molten peach sugar lava boiling and splashing… need I go on? I do thank you for the recipe, and I will be making it again in the future. Just in single batches and of course while wearing heat resistant recommended welding gear.5 stars

  9. Ken Campbell says

    My wife and I made some peach jam this summer it was our first time using recipe. I think we did something wrong cause after 2 weeks on sleffe they started molding, then we tried another batch and tried putting them in the cooler and about 3 weeks later they started molding. can you give some advice please? we used 4 lbs. of fresh peaches, sugar, lemon juice

    • Mary Younkin says

      Hi Ken, I’m not sure which recipe you used, but I’ve never had a batch mold on me. The only thing I can guess is that the jars or lids might not have been sterile. Did you boil them prior to adding the hot jam? I wish I could be more helpful!

  10. Carrie Peck says

    When you say 1 package of pectin…is that the SureJell 1.75 oz? The Ball 4.75 oz? I’m a newbie and have no idea!

    • Mary Younkin says

      I’m guessing that will work fine, but I have no idea how much you’ll need. I’d try using the recommended amount for a standard jam recipe. (i.e. whatever is comparable to a package of pectin) This is what google says about it: If your recipe calls for 1 pouch of liquid pectin, you can use dry pectin instead. The average dry pectin comes in a box with a 1.75 ounce (49 grams) packet. (Also worth noting that liquid pectin is typically added at the end of the boiling process.)

  11. Henriette Hall says

    Mary
    I love sharing tips and truly love each one I have from you. I thought you would like this one. I learned Peach Jam from my Grand Mother–instead of using packages pectin–she used the peach pits ( this is where the natural pectin is located ) She would drop the pits in and stir and stir–the jam would thicken using the pits–then spoon the pits out–DO COUNT PITS BEFORE YOU ADD THEM….I learned that hard way–took me forever to fish out the pits and make sure none ended up in the jars.5 stars

    • Mary Younkin says

      I typically blanch the peaches – boil for just a few seconds, remove to ice water bath, then the peels slide off. That said, about half the time I leave the peach skins on when I dice the peaches. They don’t bother me a bit in the jam.

  12. Rita says

    have you ever heard of brandied peaches? it’s been a traditional recipe that my family makes every holiday, going back to my great-grandmother, and probably farther back. anyway, i still have 3 quart jars in the fridge, (about 4 or 5 canned peach halves, not fresh, in each jar along with cloves, cinn sticks, and a syrup made up of a bit of brandy, sugar and syrup from the can). do you think there is a way to convert my brandied peaches into this peach jam recipe? i don’t want to add any water or lemon juice to the sauce which would dilute/change it, but if i removed the cloves and cinn sticks, crushed the peaches, then heated them and the sauce , how much pectin should i add to get the peaches to gel into a jam? email me separately if you need to see my brandied peaches recipe. thanks!

    • Mary Younkin says

      oh, man, I have no idea. I make bourbon peaches, but I’m not sure how it would convert or how safe it might be to use a previously canned recipe in another one. Sorry I can’t be more helpful, Rita!

  13. Brian Bollom says

    Tried your recipe tonight, sure smelled great! If it taste half as good we will be in business

    • Mary Younkin says

      If you use process the jars to can them, then yes, you can store it on the shelf. If you just pour the jam into jars and cover with a lid, you’ll need to refrigerate it.

      • Jenni says

        How long will they last if I don’t can them but just store them in the refrigerator? Looking forward to making this recipe soon!

        • Mary Younkin says

          I would say no more than two weeks, just to be safe. For what it’s worth, a water bath canning process isn’t difficult. It’s worth trying if you’re making more than a jar or two.

  14. Jenn Terry says

    OMG! This is THE BEST peach jam ever!

    Mine turned out more like a peach butter but I think that’s because I used a food processor to mush the peaches. No regrets though!

    I also cut the sugar in 1/2 and it was totally perfect!5 stars

  15. Connie Jenkins says

    Hi Mary,
    Your recipe sounds delicious, and I’m going to make it tomorrow! I haven’t made peach jam in about 10+ years because the last time I did, all the peaches rose to the top of the canning jars. Do you have any tips to share to prevent this from happening again?

    • Mary Younkin says

      Hi Connie! I’ve been told that it can happen if the jam is too hot when poured into jars. Allowing it to settle for 15 minutes or so before transferring it to jars should help. The following info is straight from the Pomona website:

      What you have is called “fruit float.” When the jars of jam are very hot and there is no jell yet, the pulp, which is lighter than the juice, is able to float to the top of the jar. Strawberries are prone to fruit float although it doesn’t always happen. Other fruits can have fruit float also. You are not doing anything wrong. However, if you want to discourage fruit float from happening, you can mash your fruit a little more and you can cook your fruit for a little while before you bring it up to the full boil. You could even add a little of your sweetener to cook with the fruit, still leaving enough sweetener to adequately disburse the pectin powder without going over the sweetener limit.

      In the future, when you take the jars out of the water bath, leave them for about an hour to start cooling and seal. Then come back and check to make sure they are all sealed. If you see that you have fruit float, turn the jars upside down to force the pulp to redistribute through the jar. Come back in about 45 minutes and turn the jars right side up to once again force the pulp to redistribute through the jar. Check again in another 45 minutes and if you have a distinct dividing line, turn the jars upside down again. Turn the jars right side up again in about 30 minutes. You always want the jars to end up right side up. By keeping the pulp well distributed throughout the jars, there will not be a dividing line when the jell finally starts and locks everything into place.

      If your jam has jelled in a separated state, you can gently stir the pulp and juice back together when you open the jar to eat it. Separated jam in sealed jars will store safely.

      • Connie Jenkins says

        Hi Mary!

        I made two batches of your jam yesterday! I was vetoed by my family to not put the cinnamon in though.☹️But!! Your jam recipe is ABSOLUTELY delicious I must say!!! Super easy and not complicated at all. I took your advice and let the mixture sit for 15 min after all the cooking ended to see if that would help with “fruit float”. I skimmed off the foam during this time period. EVERY jar turned out perfect!! I am SO excited!! You restored my faith in making peach jam again after all these years! Thank you! Thank you!5 stars

  16. Amy says

    I made this jam from super ripe peaches I had & what I licked out of the pot & off the spatula is delicious!!! Can’t wait to use it on ice cream & sandwiches!5 stars

  17. Rebecca L. Triesch says

    Hi, does the size of the jar matter as far as processing time is concerned? Or will it always be 5 minutes? I checked out your friend Rebecca’s,article and it mentioned that processing time depends on “the recipe and size of jars” but no specifics. I’ve only made freezer jam before, so I’m new to this.
    Thank you!5 stars

  18. Niki says

    This was my first time making jam and it was so easy! It’s a little liquidy, I may have smashed it too much or because I only put in 2 cups of sugar, but it tastes great and the canning worked too. It firmed up a bit when I put the extra jam in the refrigerator. Thanks so much!5 stars

  19. Bonnie says

    Your recipe sounds wonderful and i’m Looking forward to trying it. I’ve been looking for a recipe for peach raspberry jam, but haven’t found one that will work for the amount of peaches and raspberries I have. Do you have any suggestions?

  20. Susan Stoker says

    I made the peach jam and added some apricots. It turned out fantastic and delicious!! Loved the hint of cinnamon too!! Thank you!!5 stars

  21. Sandy Hart says

    Made this today. I took into account the other comments regarding the sweetness and thin consistency. Used only 2 cups sugar and added 1/4 cup of EZ gel along with the box of Sure gel. If your peaches are really sweet, I think that even 2 c sugar is a bit too much. Making another batch tomorrow with less sugar. Excellent flavor omitted spices.

  22. Jeannie Brown says

    Turned out absolutely delicious I tripled the recipe and made 17 jars of it. How long can the jars last if you store in a cool dark dry area?5 stars

    • Mary Younkin says

      They’re good for at least a year, Jeannie. (Although, I know I’ve kept them for 2-3 years myself.) The jam might darken slightly, but I’ve never had a problem with it for a longer time period.

  23. Kelli says

    Planning to make this tomorrow! Two questions:
    Will it matter if I use the pink box Sure-Jel (low sugar)? That’s what I have on hand.
    What will happen if I chop and crush the peaches, but do not peel them? Will it alter the taste in any way? Thanks! Glad to find your recipe……sounds fabulous.

  24. Kaye says

    Hi, I’m looking forward to making this jam.
    Could you tell me which sugar i should use please. Thank you.

  25. Cindy Schreiber says

    Made your recipe yesterday. Very easy and jam tastes wonderful but it did not thicken very much. Any idea why. It’s more like sauce.

    • Mary Younkin says

      Hi, Cindy. Did you by any chance substitute an ingredient? Did it reach a rolling boil? -This means the jelly is boiling so hard that it cannot be stirred down.- Usually, it’s one of those two things.

  26. Jean Schwartz says

    I just made 3 pints of this jam. And I have to say that the flavor is AMAZING. I’m not inclined to comment on most recipes I find online, but this one stands out as unique. I’m going to make another batch tomorrow!5 stars

  27. Barb Brockamp says

    Made this today –I added plums along with the peaches and added cloves, nutmeg and pie spice along with the cinnamon–YUMMO!! Will be great this winter!5 stars

  28. Emily says

    I just wanted to say thank you for this recipe! It tastes just like my grandmother’s (recipe lost, unfortunately). The stores in my area only sell one brand of peach jam and it’s not very good, so I’ve always wanted to try making it myself. This was so easy to make and helped thin out the 25lb box of peaches we just got from the Peach Truck. Only downside is my two-year-old ran off with the little bowl of peach foam before I got to try it. She seemed to enjoy it, though. Can’t wait to try more of your recipes!5 stars

  29. Kate C. says

    This is delicious. I am saving it as spiced peach jelly and it is excellent with or without the cinnamon. If you use very ripe peaches, squish by hand (clean, of course), and add just a bit more pectin (another Tablespoon), it makes almost a preserve with the peaches suspended throughout. This was my first attempt at using powdered pectin instead of the liquid and I was very pleasantly surprised. Definitely a saver! Thanks for sharing your recipe.5 stars

  30. Mike Emmons says

    Every concerned agency and canning company is warning people away from using wax to seal jars. There is probably something to that.

  31. Marlene Toroni says

    Made this peach jam for the first time today using our homegrown peaches and it turned out amazing. I used the cinnamon but may cut amount in half or omit it entirely next time just to see how it tastes without it. I put a dab on some crackers and jalapeño cream cheese… YUMMO! It set up perfectly and made 8 half pint jars. Can’t wait to share it with the family!5 stars

  32. GiGi says

    You made this look so easy! Ive always wanted to try making a preserve, I’m going to have to try this recipe. Thank you!

  33. Barbara Kelley says

    My grandmother used to make peach jam and it sure was good on hot buttered biscuits. When the weather is cold outside his nice to have something good for breakfast such as this.

  34. Susan says

    Mary, I bought a case of Georgia peaches from a trucking company. The peaches in this case are mushy and kind of dry inside. I hate throwing out $46 worth of peaches so I am wondering if I can use them to make jam….or even at the very least smoothies. But I like the idea of jam better if it’s possible.

  35. Dawn says

    I’ve used this recipe before and it always turns out great! Just finished two batches this morning. Thank you so much.

  36. Danielle Wilson says

    Just made this today and the foam was delicious! How long do i need to wait before the jam is ready to eat?

  37. Tasha says

    I’m fairly new to canning. I only have liquid pectin. Can I use it in place of powdered. Also, can I omit lemon juice if I don’t have any or enough? Many thanks!

    • Mary Younkin says

      The liquid pectin should work if you have the appropriate amount, Tasha. You can skip the lemon, if you want, but I would definitely add whatever amount you do have.

  38. Pierre says

    This is way too much sugar. I used 4 cups and the jam is still too sweet. Next time I will start with only 2 1/2 cups

  39. Jane says

    First time ever making peach jam and we made 4 batches and this jam is delicious. The next time we make it I would definitely cut back on the sugar because we have really sweet Peaches so it made the jam very sweet. We used cinnamon and It certainly gave the jam a beautiful taste. Looking forward to using this all winter and also for sharing with some friends.5 stars

  40. Mary Raynor says

    Hi Mary, Thank you for posting this jam recipe! I am a first time canner and jam maker 😀 Your directions were great, but I did something wrong 😳
    All of the peaches floated to the top and the “jelled” part is on the bottom. We will just stir it before we eat it, but for next time, any suggestions?
    I couldn’t get the picture of my jars to attach.
    Thanks!5 stars

    • Mary Younkin says

      Hi Mary! I’ve been told that it can happen if the jam is too hot when poured into jars. Allowing it to settle for 15 minutes or so before transferring it to jars should help. The following info is straight from the Pomona website:

      What you have is called “fruit float.” When the jars of jam are very hot and there is no jell yet, the pulp, which is lighter than the juice, is able to float to the top of the jar. Strawberries are prone to fruit float although it doesn’t always happen. Other fruits can have fruit float also. You are not doing anything wrong. However, if you want to discourage fruit float from happening, you can mash your fruit a little more and you can cook your fruit for a little while before you bring it up to the full boil. You could even add a little of your sweetener to cook with the fruit, still leaving enough sweetener to adequately disburse the pectin powder without going over the sweetener limit.

      In the future, when you take the jars out of the water bath, leave them for about an hour to start cooling and seal. Then come back and check to make sure they are all sealed. If you see that you have fruit float, turn the jars upside down to force the pulp to redistribute through the jar. Come back in about 45 minutes and turn the jars right side up to once again force the pulp to redistribute through the jar. Check again in another 45 minutes and if you have a distinct dividing line, turn the jars upside down again. Turn the jars right side up again in about 30 minutes. You always want the jars to end up right side up. By keeping the pulp well distributed throughout the jars, there will not be a dividing line when the jell finally starts and locks everything into place.

      If your jam has jelled in a separated state, you can gently stir the pulp and juice back together when you open the jar to eat it. Separated jam in sealed jars will store safely.

  41. Michaela Goss says

    Hello, our jam did not set. It is still super runny, but we went through the instructions diligently and followed it to a T. Do you know what might have caused it not to set?

  42. Katy Koskela says

    Although I have made jam before, this is my first peach jam. I hope to accumulate several kinds in small jars to use as guest gifts at my son’s wedding next summer. I got 7 half pints of beautiful golden jam to start off the jam making!5 stars

  43. Isabelle says

    I am so excited to try this recipe! However I do not have all the equipment to can it once done And cannot really get all of this stuff for right now. How long is the jam good for in the refrigerator without canning? Just in a regular mason jar without processing.

    • Mary Younkin says

      There are approximately 4 tablespoons of powdered pectin in a packet of pectin. You’ll need to use twice that much liquid pectin to substitute it. 8 tablespoons liquid pectin = 1/2 cup. I hope that helps!

  44. hannah domaney says

    Hi Mary,
    Are half pint jars a necessity? I have a few cases of pint jars left from this years canning projects and would love to use them up if possible. I know size matters with some recipes!

    Hannah

  45. Mary Jo says

    I’m looking forward to trying your peach jam recipe. To clarify, do you peel the peach skins with a knife or peeler?

  46. deborah says

    can i reduce sugar? it is far too much for my taste. I only have the regulat pectin, could not find th low sugar/pink box one.

  47. Linda Russell says

    I followed the instructions accurately and had to use liquid pectin. The flavors are on point, however there was twice as much juice as fruit. I don’t know what I may have done wrong.

  48. stefany says

    i’ve got my peaches and all equipment ready to go but some of the peaches are still a little firm to the touch. is it okay to use or leave peaches out on the counter during a warm day?

    • Mary Younkin says

      There are approximately 4 tablespoons of powdered pectin in a packet of pectin. You’ll need to use twice that much liquid pectin to substitute it. 8 tablespoons liquid pectin = 1/2 cup. I hope that helps!

  49. Michelle Balter says

    I made this recipe today, with white peaches, because that’s what my tree produces, and it was superb! Hands down, the best peach jam I’ve ever made.5 stars

  50. Maureen McLaughlin says

    First time jam maker here :). Great recipe, super delicious. But like someone else mentioned peaches in my view are very sweet, I cut the sugar in half, and would cut it down even more next time. Gel came together and taste was amazing!5 stars

  51. Cindy says

    I want to make this recipe but with a ‘light’ pectin. I’ve made freezer jams but never a pectin jam. Would you happen to know the amount of sugar I would use instead? I love the addition of cinnamon and am very excited to try it.5 stars

  52. Cheryl says

    I made this jam 2 days ago and just tried it. It taste like pure sugar is there anyway to fix it or do I have to throw away the 10 4oz jars I made. I am so bummed it was the first time ever making jam and first year we ever grew peaches after 15 years this was the first year that we actually had peaches. Can I add something and recook it please help.

    • Mary Younkin says

      Hi Cheryl, it sounds like the peaches might not have been super flavorful on their own. I’ve had that happen once in the past when I tried making jam to utilize some less than great fruit. It’s a bummer. If I had all those jars, I’d probably make a second batch of jam with half the sugar and super flavorful peaches, maybe some extra lemon too, and then mix the two, heat just to get them hot (taste to make sure the flavor is there) and then process them once again.

    • Mary Younkin says

      Hi Sharon, you’ll add it at the same time. I haven’t tried liquid pectin myself, but it’s my understanding that you’ll want to use twice as much liquid pectin as powdered.

  53. Katie says

    Wow. This peach jam recipe was the best I have ever tried. I told my mom it tastes like peach pie in a jar it’s that good. I made one batch and it was so delicious I went ahead later that afternoon and made another. This will be my go to peach jam recipe from now on. Thank you!5 stars

  54. scottjl says

    Made this with some yellow peaches I had lying around. Used 1/2 tsp cinnamon. Quick and easy recipe. Amazing! Someone in my family who “doesn’t like peaches” even said “I’d eat more of that”. It was delicious warm out of the pot. Did make 6 and a half 8oz jars for me. Some times the simplest recipes are the best! Will definitely be making this again. Thank you!5 stars

  55. Kathy says

    Just tried this jam for the first time and I have to say WOW!!!!!

    Our peaches are in season and delicious so I wanted to try and make the jam. The receipe was easy to follow from start to finish.

    Thank you for sharing5 stars

  56. Howie says

    Thanks for the great recipe had 6 cups so I justed add accordingly the only thing I did differently is added a tablespoon of vanilla extract.5 stars

    • Mary Younkin says

      Hi Patricia, without being in your kitchen with you, it’s hard to guess what might have gone wrong. If you’d like to attempt to save it, for every 4 cups of jam that needs to be remade, whisk together 1/4 cup sugar and 1 tablespoon powdered pectin. Pour the runny jam into a clean pot and add the sugar and pectin. Bring the jam to a boil over medium-high heat and stir until the sugar and pectin have dissolved. Cook vigorously for 5 to 10 minutes, stirring regularly. Test to see if it has thickened. Pour into sterilized jars and process once again.

  57. Catherine says

    I made TWO batches of this jam. I was so nervous because I wasn’t following the usual Bernadine recipe — I was going rogue! My family typically prefers a less sweet jam, so I cut the sugar by one cup, and the lemon juice gave it just enough zip to say “hello” to my taste buds. I want it on everything! LOL. Thank you so much for posting this recipe. I don’t know how I stumbled onto it, but I’m so glad I did!5 stars

  58. Barb says

    Never made peach jam before and it was so easy to do. My granddaughter and I had it on toast within an hour of making it. I making another batch tomorrow. I will be adding this to my granddaughter’s recipe box5 stars

  59. Tina says

    Mary, I’m wondering which peach jam you prefer. I’ve only made cooked peach jam. Do you prefer the cooked or the freezer peach jam recipe?

  60. Leslie says

    Smells and tastes lovely but did not set. Used a whole package of liquid pectin which should be an exact substitute for A package of dry pectin. But perhaps not???1 star

    • Mary Younkin says

      Hi Leslie, there are approximately 4 tablespoons of powdered pectin in a packet of pectin. I don’t know how much is typically in a package of liquid pectin, but you would need to use twice that much liquid pectin to substitute it. 8 tablespoons liquid pectin = 1/2 cup. I hope that helps!

  61. Christine Zollers says

    Thank you for posting this recipe! I used cinnamon and allspice with Pomona pectin, so I just used 3/4 cup sugar. Delicious!5 stars

    • Mary Younkin says

      You will need twice as much liquid pection, but it should work fine, Rosanna. There are approximately 4 tablespoons of powdered pectin in a packet of pectin. You will need to use twice that much liquid pectin to substitute it. 8 tablespoons liquid pectin = 1/2 cup. I hope that helps!

  62. Tammy Watson says

    Hi there just curious if anyone has made this recipe before but left the skins on? Hope to try this recipe today and will come back and rate as looks delicious.

  63. PUSHPAL says

    I have never made any kind of jam or canned peaches or pears. I am interested to make jam for the first time.

  64. Carol says

    Hello,
    Is it necessary to process the jam in a water bath? I have made lots of jam over the years but have not used that method. Thanks!

  65. Kim says

    As a “brand new canner”, I made few different recipes of peach jam this year — this is BY far the best flavor and set up! Thank you.5 stars

  66. Lea Ann Smullin says

    Love this!!! I also added a touch of vanilla extract along with the cinnamon! Only used 4 cups of sugar (as that’s all I had, lol) but it is fabulous!! Thank you!5 stars

  67. Koula says

    I am planning on making your peach jam in a day or two. Wondering how do I do the water bath? Seal jars? Water half way up the jars? Place in oven at what temperature? For how long?

    I usually make tomato sauce and I boil the jars sealed jars. Never done them in the oven.

  68. Heather G says

    Could you advise on how to substitute liquid pectin in this recipe? The grocery store was sold out of the powdered pectin, and I would love to try this out while I still have some peaches. Thanks!

    • Mary Younkin says

      Hi Heather, there are approximately 4 tablespoons of powdered pectin in a packet of pectin. I don’t know how much is typically in a package of liquid pectin, but you would need to use twice that much liquid pectin to substitute it. 8 tablespoons liquid pectin = 1/2 cup. Happy jam making!

  69. Anita Mcguire says

    Followed the recipe, ending up with hot water bath but doesn’t seem to be thickening. Any suggestions? Should I rebook?

    • Mary Younkin says

      Do you mean that the peaches floated to the top of the jars, Sue? That it can happen if the jam is too hot when poured into jars. Allowing it to settle for 15 minutes or so before transferring it to jars should help. The following info is straight from the Pomona website:

      What you have is called “fruit float.” When the jars of jam are very hot and there is no jell yet, the pulp, which is lighter than the juice, is able to float to the top of the jar. Strawberries are prone to fruit float although it doesn’t always happen. Other fruits can have fruit float also. You are not doing anything wrong. However, if you want to discourage fruit float from happening, you can mash your fruit a little more and you can cook your fruit for a little while before you bring it up to the full boil. You could even add a little of your sweetener to cook with the fruit, still leaving enough sweetener to adequately disburse the pectin powder without going over the sweetener limit.

      In the future, when you take the jars out of the water bath, leave them for about an hour to start cooling and seal. Then come back and check to make sure they are all sealed. If you see that you have fruit float, turn the jars upside down to force the pulp to redistribute through the jar. Come back in about 45 minutes and turn the jars right side up to once again force the pulp to redistribute through the jar. Check again in another 45 minutes and if you have a distinct dividing line, turn the jars upside down again. Turn the jars right side up again in about 30 minutes. You always want the jars to end up right side up. By keeping the pulp well distributed throughout the jars, there will not be a dividing line when the jell finally starts and locks everything into place.

      If your jam has jelled in a separated state, you can gently stir the pulp and juice back together when you open the jar to eat it. Separated jam in sealed jars will store safely.

    • Mary Younkin says

      Hi Heather, there are approximately 4 tablespoons of powdered pectin in a packet of pectin. I don’t know how much is typically in a package of liquid pectin, but you would need to use twice that much liquid pectin to substitute it. 8 tablespoons liquid pectin = 1/2 cup. Happy jam making!

  70. Courtney says

    This is my second time canning and because I am so new, the whole process makes me nervous. Still, I ordered a box of Utah peaches and used this recipe to make peach jam for the first time. I just pulled them out of the water bath about an hour ago and so far all but two of my ten jars have sealed (I made a big batch because I have A LOT of peaches) and we are DEVOURING the foam, oh my word. If the foam is any indication of how good the jam will be, this recipe is pure heaven. So glad to have found it!5 stars

    • Mary Younkin says

      Hi Judy, there are approximately 4 tablespoons of powdered pectin in a packet of pectin. I don’t know how much is typically in a package of liquid pectin, but you would need to use twice that much liquid pectin to substitute it. 8 tablespoons liquid pectin = 1/2 cup. Happy jam making!

  71. Jen says

    I love how simple this is! 3lb cut up peaches, used the immersion blender to do additional rough chopping, and it is the best with spicy cinnamon, great for waffles too!5 stars